National Alzheimer’s Project Act Launches a Promising New Era Of Research

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The National Alzheimer’s Project Act of 2011 authorized the Secretary of Health and Human Services to centralize all federal research efforts to combat the disease under that department’s umbrella. The concept helps strategize research, care and services moving forward, with the main goal of preventing and effectively treating Alzheimer’s disease by 2025, according to the National Institute on Aging.

Other Goals

Another goal of these research initiatives includes enhancing quality and efficiency of care. The law also addresses the need to expand support networks for people with this disease so that they and their families can get help. Public awareness and support also comes into play, and computer systems improve research tracking.

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Image by Walk to End Alzheimer’s via Facebook

Research

One of the first steps taken by the Department of Health and Human Services involved creating a centralized database that compiles Alzheimer’s disease research initiatives. The International Alzheimer’s Disease Research Portfolio, run by the NIA, allows any interested party to view the sources of funding for specific research projects for Alzheimer’s Disease. This database helps companies, organizations and agencies allocate funding better so companies don’t duplicate research projects. The database fits into the plan, especially since the public can access this database and track the progress of research patterns.

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Image by Susumu Komatsu via Flickr

Treatment and Prevention

The kickoff event for this law was the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Summit 2012: Path to Treatment and Prevention, a conference of more than 500 health professionals held in May 2012. The gathering brought together national and international scientists with the goal of developing new ways to treat and prevent dementia. Researchers discussed working collaboratively with advocacy groups and health care industry representatives to reduce barriers that hinder scientific progress. The conference also talked about creating the infrastructure needed to quickly develop new therapies and how to find these new methods of treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.

No one has to suffer alone with Alzheimer’s disease. Thanks to new government initiatives, scientists may be one step closer to preventing this debilitating illness.


Stop by The Alzheimer’s Site to see how you can help and learn more about the millions of people who care for someone with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.

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The Alzheimer's Site is a place where people can come together to support those whose lives have been affected by Alzheimer's disease. In addition to sharing stories of hope and love, shopping for the cause, and signing petitions, visitors can take just a moment each day to click on the purple button to help provide care for those living with Alzheimer's disease and research for a brighter future. Visit The Alzheimer's Site and click today - it's free!